Posts by Jacob Ayers

153: How to Grow and Maintain Your Wealth with Omar Khan

Omar Khan – Chartered Financial Analyst, Investor, & Wealth Manager
Omar is the founder and President of Boardwalk Wealth, a private equity firm located in Dallas, Texas.

Omar and his team at Boardwalk Wealth  help international investors with US-based multifamily real estate opportunities. Their unique focus is helping Canadians identify ideal commercial real estate in the Southern United States.

Omar is responsible for capital raising, strategic planning and investor relations. He has over 10 years of global investment experience.He has participated in capital financing and M&A transactions valued at $3.7 billion. He is a CFA Charterholder and graduated with honors from the University of Toronto with a B.Com in Finance.

Omar moved from Canada and lives in Texas with his wife and newborn son.

Key Points
Investing internationally – following markets that meet your investment criteria
Buying vs. renting – what is right for you?
How the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act affect single family vs. multifamily investing
So you’re going to rent and invest in multifamily. Now what?
Lightning Questions
What was your biggest hurdle getting started in real estate investing, and how did you overcome it?
Building a network, and creating relationships organically.
Do you have a personal habit that contributes to your success?
Omar is very organized and lives by his calendar.
Do you have an online resource you find valuable?
Omar is an avid reader, and also listens to podcasts
What book would you recommend to the listeners and why?
Investing in Real Estate Private Equity by Sean Cook
If you were to give advice to your 20 year old self to  get started in real estate investing, what would it be?
Continue building more and more relationships.
Resources
Boardwalk Wealth

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Contact Jacob

152: Time Blocking – Friday Fundamentals

In Episode 148 we discussed success and the dichotomies that come along with it. Success is something many people strive for but don’t have defined. In order to achieve success, however you define it, you must know what it is you’re pursuing. Along the journey to your success, you’ll experience many dichotomies, and must be prepared to handle those. These are lessons extrapolated and inspired by Jocko Willink, former U.S. Navy Marine and combat veteran.

This episode will focus on goal setting, but with a twist. This is another lesson inspired by Jocko Willink and Leif Babbin in their book, The Dichotomy of Leadership. 

See, success and goal setting go together hand in hand. Rarely does one achieve success with out setting goals. And rarely does one set goals without defining success. Staring with the end in mind, it’s important to think about what you want your life to be like. Here are some questions that will help you determine that.

Who is most important to you and how do you want to spend your time with them?
What core values are important to you? I.e. – money, security, health, happiness,
How do you want to spend your time, right down to the very day?
Do you want to work and build an empire, retire early with a modest lifestyle?
These are all things to consider when building your lifestyle by design. By defining these things you can start to picture what success looks like to you, and how to get there.

Now that you know what success looks like for you, you can begin setting goals to achieve that success. There are 5 specific qualities your goal must have. Without these 5 qualities, a goal is just a dream and nothing more. Your goal must embody the acronym SMART.

S – Specific
M – Measurable
A – Accountable
R – Realistic
T – Time
If your goal isn’t specific, then you can get side tracking in your journey. If you goal is to simply “be rich” or “retire early”, those are not specific. What does rich mean? Is it a net worth of one million dollars, ten million dollars, one hundred million dollars? Does retire early mean at 62 and live off social security? Or retire at 40 and surf in San Diego for half the year?

Your goal must be measurable. If you can’t measure it, you can’t track your progress. It must be concrete.

You must be held accountable to your goal. You can do this by telling others about your goal, and even having an accountability partner or mentor to keep you on track. If you are held accountable by reporting progress of your goal to someone else, you’re much more likely to achieve it.

Your goal should be realistic. This is one that trips many people up. People often over estimate what they can do in a year, and underestimate what they can do in a decade. Just look at new years resolutions for example. While your goal should be attainable, it should also push your limits and force you to level up in order to achieve it.

lastly, your goal must me bound by time. You must achieve your goal within a certain time frame. Otherwise, it will just be a “some day” goal, which isn’t a goal, but rather a dream.

A SMART goal must be specific, measurable, accountable, realistic, and time bound.

If setting goals sounds like a waste of time to you, and you’re just going to go full steam ahead barreling towards success (that you likely don’t have defined) then you may want to rethink that strategy. Jocko Willink talks about a lesson he learned on the battlefield and how it relates to the real world. You see, Jocko was in command of a task unit, comprised of two platoons. He was leading his troops on high stakes mission in Ramadi, Iraq just like he had for hundreds of missions prior. He and his team were clearing a building, and they came across a scenario, which required direction from Jocko. They knew the layout of the building prior to breaching it, but as with anything in Ramadi, there was a surprise. There was a hallway to an unknown door. Jocko had to make a call. Breach the door with an explosive charge devastating everything on the other side or make forcible entry with less a less lethal option. Jocko, along with his team of Navy Seals, was staring down the barrel of his rifle, aim on the door. It was in this moment he realized that he could only see down this one line of sight, and wasn’t getting the full picture. He pointed his weapon to the ceiling, and looked around, scanning his surroundings. He assessed the situation and made the call to not breach the door with explosive charges, due to the unknown on the other side. After less fatally breaching the door with force, Jocko and his team found on the other side a family who would have been severely injured  had they breached with an explosive charge.

Jocko and his team had defined what a successful mission would be – no casualties to their men, or civilians. With their targets set, they set out to execute their mission. In the midst of the action, Jocko realized he could only see what he was aiming at, both literally and figuratively. Sure, he was aiming at the right thing, but what else around him had changed? The goal was the same, the the approach had changed. It took Jocko adjusting his aim, looking around, and assessing the situation to make the call and stay on the patch to executing the platoon’s goal.

So how does this relate to goal setting? Great question. See, just like Jocko and the Charlie platoon, you too are on a mission to success. You must define that success, set goals to achieve that success, and make a plan of action. Sometime you have to take a look around and make sure you’re still on the right path to success. Tunnel vision is good, if you’re in the right tunnel. If you’ve strayed off path, you might never know without reassessing your end goal, and your current path to get there.

So what are you aiming at? Are you on track to achieve your goals? Do have goals set to achieve success? It’s important to live intentionally and with purpose. Create your lifestyle by design. Define success, set goals, and take aim at your targets. Remember, enjoy the journey and look around every now and then.

151: You Need More Money with Matt Manero

Matt Manero – Entrepreneur, Author, & Investor
Matt launched his first company, Commercial Fleet Financing, Inc. (CFF), in 1995 with a phone, a folding table and the unyielding confidence of a single client, a trucker. Fast forward 23 years and CFF, has funded over $1 billion in transportation equipment with annual business of $150,000,000+. CFF has served more than 10,000 clients and has become one of the largest independently owned transportation equipment finance companies in America. CFF is a 3-time winner of The SMU Cox School of Business 100 Fastest Growing Companies.

His companies have been recognized in publications such as Inc. Magazine, Dallas Business Journal, Overdrive Magazine, Fleet Owner, Transport Topics, Commercial Carrier Journal, and Dealer Solutions Magazine.

Audiences resonate with his tough-minded and business battle tested philosophies on “company culture”, skilling up and scaling up” and “finding your GRIT”. He is willing and eager to share his positive and negative experiences within both the personal and business world with others. Matt is a sought after speaker within the entrepreneurial and association communities, and has a highly popular podcast aptly named, YOU NEED MORE MONEY.

Matt’s first book, THE GRIT, was published in 2015. His latest book, YOU NEED MORE MONEY, launched in March of 2018 and was published by Penguin/Random House.

He is happily married to his beloved wife of 19 years, Rokki, and they have 3 amazing boys, John (16), Jack (13), and Julian (12). They live in Dallas/Ft. Worth, Texas.

Key Points
Who is your ideal customer?
Who money is a taboo topic too and why
Three stages of wealth: broke, accumulation, and rich
Lifestyle by design
Stacking and racking cash in accumulation mode
False positive – when you think you’re doing better than you are
Time blocking to maintain your lifestyle by design
Lightning Questions
What was your biggest hurdle getting started in real estate investing, and how did you overcome it?
Matt was his own worst enemy. With social esteem issues, Matt didn’t think he was worthy of connecting with mentors and influencers. He waited too long to find an accountability group.
Do you have a personal habit that contributes to your success?
Matt is a gritty guy. When he says he’s going to do something, he does it. After weighing his options, and making a decision, he’s all
Do you have an online resource you find valuable?
Business Finishing School
What book would you recommend to the listeners and why?
The 10X Rule by Grant Cardone
If you were to give advice to your 20 year old self to  get started in real estate investing, what would it be?
From 20-25, Matt would say worry about things less. Don’t worry about how things are going to play out.
Resources
Matt Manero.com

YOU NEED MORE MONEY by Matt Manero

The Grit by Matt Manero

 Visit Audible for a free trail and free audio book download!

150: What Are You Aiming At? – Friday Fundamentals

In Episode 148 we discussed success and the dichotomies that come along with it. Success is something many people strive for but don’t have defined. In order to achieve success, however you define it, you must know what it is you’re pursuing. Along the journey to your success, you’ll experience many dichotomies, and must be prepared to handle those. These are lessons extrapolated and inspired by Jocko Willink, former U.S. Navy Marine and combat veteran.

This episode will focus on goal setting, but with a twist. This is another lesson inspired by Jocko Willink and Leif Babbin in their book, The Dichotomy of Leadership. 

See, success and goal setting go together hand in hand. Rarely does one achieve success with out setting goals. And rarely does one set goals without defining success. Staring with the end in mind, it’s important to think about what you want your life to be like. Here are some questions that will help you determine that.

Who is most important to you and how do you want to spend your time with them?
What core values are important to you? I.e. – money, security, health, happiness,
How do you want to spend your time, right down to the very day?
Do you want to work and build an empire, retire early with a modest lifestyle?
These are all things to consider when building your lifestyle by design. By defining these things you can start to picture what success looks like to you, and how to get there.

Now that you know what success looks like for you, you can begin setting goals to achieve that success. There are 5 specific qualities your goal must have. Without these 5 qualities, a goal is just a dream and nothing more. Your goal must embody the acronym SMART.

S – Specific
M – Measurable
A – Accountable
R – Realistic
T – Time
If your goal isn’t specific, then you can get side tracking in your journey. If you goal is to simply “be rich” or “retire early”, those are not specific. What does rich mean? Is it a net worth of one million dollars, ten million dollars, one hundred million dollars? Does retire early mean at 62 and live off social security? Or retire at 40 and surf in San Diego for half the year?

Your goal must be measurable. If you can’t measure it, you can’t track your progress. It must be concrete.

You must be held accountable to your goal. You can do this by telling others about your goal, and even having an accountability partner or mentor to keep you on track. If you are held accountable by reporting progress of your goal to someone else, you’re much more likely to achieve it.

Your goal should be realistic. This is one that trips many people up. People often over estimate what they can do in a year, and underestimate what they can do in a decade. Just look at new years resolutions for example. While your goal should be attainable, it should also push your limits and force you to level up in order to achieve it.

lastly, your goal must me bound by time. You must achieve your goal within a certain time frame. Otherwise, it will just be a “some day” goal, which isn’t a goal, but rather a dream.

A SMART goal must be specific, measurable, accountable, realistic, and time bound.

If setting goals sounds like a waste of time to you, and you’re just going to go full steam ahead barreling towards success (that you likely don’t have defined) then you may want to rethink that strategy. Jocko Willink talks about a lesson he learned on the battlefield and how it relates to the real world. You see, Jocko was in command of a task unit, comprised of two platoons. He was leading his troops on high stakes mission in Ramadi, Iraq just like he had for hundreds of missions prior. He and his team were clearing a building, and they came across a scenario, which required direction from Jocko. They knew the layout of the building prior to breaching it, but as with anything in Ramadi, there was a surprise. There was a hallway to an unknown door. Jocko had to make a call. Breach the door with an explosive charge devastating everything on the other side or make forcible entry with less a less lethal option. Jocko, along with his team of Navy Seals, was staring down the barrel of his rifle, aim on the door. It was in this moment he realized that he could only see down this one line of sight, and wasn’t getting the full picture. He pointed his weapon to the ceiling, and looked around, scanning his surroundings. He assessed the situation and made the call to not breach the door with explosive charges, due to the unknown on the other side. After less fatally breaching the door with force, Jocko and his team found on the other side a family who would have been severely injured  had they breached with an explosive charge.

Jocko and his team had defined what a successful mission would be – no casualties to their men, or civilians. With their targets set, they set out to execute their mission. In the midst of the action, Jocko realized he could only see what he was aiming at, both literally and figuratively. Sure, he was aiming at the right thing, but what else around him had changed? The goal was the same, the the approach had changed. It took Jocko adjusting his aim, looking around, and assessing the situation to make the call and stay on the patch to executing the platoon’s goal.

So how does this relate to goal setting? Great question. See, just like Jocko and the Charlie platoon, you too are on a mission to success. You must define that success, set goals to achieve that success, and make a plan of action. Sometime you have to take a look around and make sure you’re still on the right path to success. Tunnel vision is good, if you’re in the right tunnel. If you’ve strayed off path, you might never know without reassessing your end goal, and your current path to get there.

So what are you aiming at? Are you on track to achieve your goals? Do have goals set to achieve success? It’s important to live intentionally and with purpose. Create your lifestyle by design. Define success, set goals, and take aim at your targets. Remember, enjoy the journey and look around every now and then.

149: Realtor Perspectives on Investing with Karen Briscoe

Karen Briscoe – Investor, Author, & Realtor
Karen Briscoe is principal owner of the Huckaby Briscoe Conroy Group (HBC) with Keller Williams. The HBC Group has been recognized by the Wall Street Journal as one of the 250 Top Realtor® teams in the United States. Further the team has ranked in the top 100 teams with Keller Williams International every year since 2009, the year the group joined KW. The team consists of Karen, her business partner Lizzy Conroy, a managing director, staff of four and seven associate agents.

Karen began her real estate career developing residential lots with the Trammel Crow Company in Dallas, Texas. In Northern Virginia she worked in commercial real estate with The Staubach Company prior to entering residential sales. Karen earned a Master’s degree from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas and received her BA from Stephens College in Columbia, Missouri–her hometown. Karen recently completed the John Maxwell Team Certification Program for Coaching, Speaking and Training. Karen is a contributor to Inman and Real Trends.

Key Points
Becoming an accidental landlord
Defining your investing principals and sticking to them
Identifying qualitative vs. quantitative parameters for your investments
Not trying to buy home runs, rather slow and steady
Buying in the path of progress
Success in 5 Minutes a Day
Lightning Questions
What was your biggest hurdle getting started in real estate investing, and how did you overcome it?
Karen experienced the savings and loan crisis, and that fear held her back. By pursuing opportunities, Karen took action and overcame that fear.
Do you have a personal habit that contributes to your success?
Karen practices a morning routing, inspired by Hal Elrod’s  Miracle Morning.
Audible
Podcasts
What book would you recommend to the listeners and why?
The Big Leap by Gay Hendricks
Miracle Morning by Hal Elrod
Real Estate Success in 5 Minutes per Day by Karen Briscoe
If you were to give advice to your 20 year old self to  get started in real estate investing, what would it be?
Start now. Take action. Buy by the fundamentals and have a good strong hold strategy.
Resources
5MinuteSuccess.com 

Real Estate Success in 5 Minutes per Day by Karen Briscoe

 Visit Audible for a free trail and free audio book download!